Building a Tech Focused Sticker Printing E-commerce Business – David Rubie-Todd of Sticker It

INTERVIEW VIDEO (Length – 41:08)

PODCAST AUDIO

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Intro

David Rubie-Todd of Sticker It shares the story of building a technology-focused sticker printing e-commerce business.

People & Resources Mentioned in the Episode

Book: The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People; and Principles for Success.

What You’ll Learn

Interview with David Rubie-Todd of Sticker It

00:00Introduction
01:04How did you get started
03:15Printing business vs a Technology Business
05:24Why Stickers printing
09:04Differentiation
13:07Expanding beyond Stickers
15:41Sticker Use Cases
17:12Sales Force
19:19Using Bigcommerce
23:23Team
25:01Post Purchase Experience
29:47Mistakes made
33:12Social Media Marketing
34:29Rapid Fire round

Rapid Fire

In this segment, the guest will answer a few questions quickly in one or two sentences.

David Rubie-Todd of Sticker It

  1. One book that you would recommend to entrepreneurs/business professionals in 2021 and why? (Response: The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People; and Principles for Success)
  2. An innovative product or idea in the current eCommerce, retail, or tech landscape that you feel excited about (Response: Jasper)
  3. A startup or business and eCommerce retailer tech that you think is currently doing great things (Dialogflow)
  4. A business or productivity tool or software that you would recommend (Response: Use “Asana” and read “Eat That Frog”)
  5. An entrepreneur or business person whom you look up to or someone who inspires you (Response: Adam Norris)
  6. Best business advice you ever received (Response: Focus on your passion)

Interview Transcript

Sushant Misra of TrepTalks  

Hey there entrepreneurs My name is Sushant and welcome to Dropbox. This is the show where I interview successful ecommerce entrepreneurs, business executives and thought leaders, and ask them questions about their business story and also dive deep into some of the strategies and tactics that they have used to start and grow their businesses. And today, I’m really excited to welcome David Ruby Todd to the show. David is the co founder of sticker it stuck sticker it prints custom stickers for some of the smallest and largest brands all over the world. And today, I’m going to ask David a few questions about his entrepreneurial journey, and some of the strategies and tactics that he has used to start and grow his business. So thank you so much for joining me today. Trep talks, David. My pleasure. So yeah, can you share a little bit about your story? How did you get started, what gave you the idea for a sticker? That was really interesting business idea.

David Rubie-Todd  

Me and my brother, we, we actually already owned a print business that we started back in 2007, I was 16. And he was 18. So we were we were kids at home at the time, really. And just started out in our parents. So back room. And, and that brands all about custom graphics and design from for motorsport. And back in 2018, we, we, we felt we could, there was an opportunity to use this sort of tech we built. And both on the print side and the sort of the the the ordering side, the customer experience side for sort of mass market customs, stickers and labels. So we launched sticker it back in 2018. And it’s sort of it proved to be a good decision. It’s grown nice and quickly, both in the sort of UK where we started, and then we’re not in the US about a year ago. And that’s actually now overtaken the UK already, which is cool and sort of slowly working our way through Europe. So the, the, I suppose the premise was all about making it easy, and an enjoyable experience to to customize a product through through printed stickers and labels. And we’ve got sort of future plans for that to move into other products, particularly sort of packaging and that sort of thing. So yeah, it’s all about printing custom stickers and labels, but make it a really easy ordering experience with then a high quality product. So it’s not sort of you get those sort of cheap printed T shirts that use for sort of a weekend event or something like that. It’s about sort of quality not compromising on quality, even though it’s custom.

Sushant Misra of TrepTalks  

So do you consider more yourself more to the printing more of a printing business or more of a technology business?

David Rubie-Todd  

Good question. We like to refer to ourselves in house as a tech business that prints stickers and and it’s a slight sort of different way of looking at it than then a print business. So we use a lot of a lot of automation. And, and our whole business is built around digital technology. So what I mean by that is, is you can kind of get old schools of analog print methods, screen printing, or where it might layer colors, one after another. But typically, with those processes, you’ll have a certain amount of setup before you can start printing whereas digital tech today, both on printing and what we will call finishing. So applying a laminate or cutting the stickers out. There are digital options for all of those. And that’s that’s the route we take. So we invest we don’t develop that in house, necessarily. So we invest in the digital side on that end, but then in house we develop a lot of our own order fulfillment side of things and because to get sort of to genuine automation, where we can spend almost two seconds per order a human being time on a custom product is sort of that’s the goal. And and yeah, we’ve we’ve already cut it by probably 60% And we’ve got sort of plans over the years to get that lower and lower. So

Sushant Misra of TrepTalks  

you started off really really early in your in your own life. I think 14 or 16 years old. Why? And this is a challenge, I think any for anyone who’s trying to start a businesses like what idea or what product or service to sell why stickers, which is very, very unique thing. And how did you know that this is actually going to be like a scalable business

David Rubie-Todd  

when you’re a kid as I was back then 32 Now, but you don’t worry about those things. And I think a lot of the sort of long term successful entrepreneurs, they don’t necessarily think about those things in in the early days, they, they, they work on what they enjoy, and and they find ways to grow it so. And they ended up building Zara’s of the world. That’s a as a huge global corporation and believe he started off as a market trader or something working on his dad’s stool and, and it’s sort of similar here, we were used to race, go karts, and, and it’s like, oh, actually, we could sell sponsorship packages here. And to do that, we need to print graphics. So we, we looked around, okay, couldn’t find anyone that we thought did it particularly well, so we then thought we’d do it, ourselves. And that’s eventually evolved into what we’re doing today. And, and, and so we there were sort of two brothers starting printing a few graphics and selling on selling them at the sort of side of the track back in 2007. And now we sort of ship hundreds of orders a week, all around the world. And it’s, I think, it’s, it’s probably a product of your ambition and vision and and wanting to be the best and and genuinely pushing to, to not accept what so not accept what’s normal. So for example, in our industry, there’s a lot of sort of workflow automation ideas, that it helps improve processes, absolutely. But I would think of automation as in genuine, no human interaction as as the goal whereas these are sort of tools to make your life easier. So I think it’s just not accepting that. This is how the industry does it. Let’s go and do it as good as we can. And that takes a lot of time and money. As people like, Tesla, they’re fine. Like they’re investing truckloads into their manufacturing is Elon Musk talks about a lot and, and finding new ways of doing it, even though you’d imagine the German sort of car companies have you, you kind of imagine they’ve got absolutely nailed. But clearly, Tesla don’t believe that, and they’re sort of pushing even more. And I think that’s, there’s there’s a huge scale, and ours is a tiny scale, but this, this sort of, I think it’s just all around that vision and, and wanting for more, if that makes sense.

Sushant Misra of TrepTalks  

So, if you think about like the competitive landscape, it’s basically a printing business, which, you know, on the front end, you have you have created this technology platform to make it easier for customers to to send their orders basically. Can other printers like other printing companies who do like regular stationery or flyers? And those kinds of things? Is it is it not easy for them to really start doing this also? Or does sticker printer is fundamentally different from other printing? Like, do you? How do you differentiate your business from other printing businesses? And like keep your competitive edge in the marketplace?

David Rubie-Todd  

Yeah, it’s a good question something I asked myself a lot, because let’s take the UK for example. There are 1000s of what I would call small print shops. So they are there companies that have let’s say, a 20,000 pound printer that will print reasonably well and and you can almost walk in off the street and go and get some some reasonable quality print. And, and clearly the barrier to entry there is almost none because most of these printer companies will finance it for you on a few 100 quid a week or whatever and, and away you go. Then then that’s sort of where, where this there’s a bit of a gap to where then we are which is so for example, we’ve got a half million quid sort of 700,000 US dollar printer arriving in May, that that That is, is, it’s such a different product output from some from one of those, it’s trying to sort of compete on a on a quality in a consistent quality. So it’s, it’s about putting out a perfect cigar every single minute of every single day almost we run six days a week, 20 hours a day. And it’s, it’s, those machines need to output perfectly every single time. So I think the barrier to getting involved and starting a little print shop easy scaling and sort of putting out beautiful quality print all day, every day is difficult. Just I mean, the kit is expensive. So that sort of half a million pounds for the printer and probably 300,000 pounds for the for the finishing. So laminating cutting, etc, etc. But that’s all very well say Okay, but how do you communicate that to a customer? And, and I suppose it’s, it’s a stack, ultimately, yes, it’s a stack of a ton of load of it, of a ton of little innovations that make it difficult to follow much like lots, I think that’s how competitive advantages are built in lots of businesses, unless you can say pattern something or it’s, it’s about the people in the business constantly thinking and doing better. And, and so if we can, if our, our SEO is a little bit better, and our website speeds a little bit better, and the quality scores a little bit better on the ads, and you end the customer experience a little bit better, and you sort of stack all these these improvements together, suddenly, they compound to actually you deliver five times the value that you’re the next person does and then that’s difficult to then catch up if you don’t come complacent and sort of and let it go. So the short answer is yes, super easy to get involved as we did when we were kids. 6000 quid was our first printer. And, and it’s it’s that leap to, to the sort of the professional side which is which is difficult. And we’ve we’ve found it difficult because it’s without external investment, which we haven’t had. It’s, it’s it’s difficult to go from buying 3020 2030 grand printers to half a million pound printers. They’re big, that big leaps.

Sushant Misra of TrepTalks  

And given that now you have reached the scale with the sticker printing, like do you ever think that you know, now you have you can expand beyond sticker, that’s something that you think about or to get into, like, you know, more of the traditional printing side of things, just because you have that scale? And maybe it’s easier for you to get into those markets?

David Rubie-Todd  

Yeah, absolutely. So one of our whole sort of focuses on when we’re building tech is, is we’re essentially building this customization platform, if that makes sense for ourselves internally. And we have a whole pipeline of products that we’d like to apply that to. And I don’t mean that sort of Vistaprint are good at business cards or more. There’s lots of people that have solved that problem. And that’s cool. But there are other products that people especially the problem, I think is for small businesses, so if you’re if you’re a big business, and it’s the same in labels, so if you’re a big alcohol brand, you can you can afford to to go the sort of analog route that I mentioned earlier and have a beautiful label with all the special effects foils so they have metallic effects and, and spot UV, which is like a raised varnish that has a nice texture, that’s all available to you because you’re gonna be buying hundreds of 1000s of labels. But if you’re the person down the road who wants 500 for an organic hand cream or something, or there’s there’s 1000s of examples that buy from us, and it’s how do we bring all those possibilities to that one man band at a reasonable price in a reasonable timescale? It’s, it’s, I think that’s the opportunity is applying that sort of thinking to to other sort of products that that would be difficult to get today, because they’re difficult for tourists seems like one is the tech is maybe still mostly analog, so that that would require us to develop some of that tech. And then the second is the buying process is how do we make it super clear exactly what they are getting. And, and for it to turn up in just a few days for reasonable prices, it’s all quite, they’re quite difficult challenges to solve.

Sushant Misra of TrepTalks  

So can you share, like some of the use cases, I’m assuming your biggest like your customers are really business, right? Like the businesses are ordering the stickers? What are some of the use cases that they’re using these stickers for?

David Rubie-Todd  

We have sort of two little set that we have three types of customers and and sort of businesses are the biggest. And typically, it’s it’s two reasons product labels is the big one, or sort of handouts at events or employee onboarding. Lot of tech companies sort of sticking on laptops and other places like that, that a lot of businesses buy for those reasons. And for sort of putting in putting in every package that maybe gets shipped out that sort of application, we have a second type of customer who is a an artist or a designer, and they will actually buy stickers sort of individually to then sell either on our website or on Etsy or something like that. And then the smallest sort of group that we currently provide for is it sort of creative, creative individuals that that are maybe buying something for a special event such as a wedding. So a bride buying something for wedding favors or something like that,

Sushant Misra of TrepTalks  

in terms of like the sales process that completely just marketing driven online, or do you have like a sales force that actually, you know, based on knowing which businesses are most profitable for you, they actually prospect and go out to those businesses and say, Hey, use our services to print sticker for your, you know, trade show, or whatever they’re doing product label, etc.

David Rubie-Todd  

I think there is there is room for that. Definitely. That’s not our, we don’t focus on that. today. We are a purely an online sort of business model. And that’s how we try and keep cost down. Is, is it’s a sort of self serve platform. And we do provide advice, because I think one of the biggest issues is is to help people understand which sticker Dubai, for their for their certain use case. Because on a stick is a sticker in some senses, but actually you can play with the the greater the adhesive and the print film, and that this actually kind of a lot of combinations you can go for. But ultimately, we try and simplify that down and sort of almost over engineer the product for most applications. So it’s it’s sort of suitable for a lot of use cases, but not all all online. We predominantly acquire customers from from Google search, SEO is our our big, big focus. And then we do quite a lot of email sort of. But that’s tends to be further down the funnel, if that makes sense. So in terms of cold, getting cold customers coming in, it’s a very, very high percentage through Google, Google SEO.

Sushant Misra of TrepTalks  

I was very interested in the platform itself, like the customer facing customization platform, I believe I read somewhere. You shifted from some other platforms like Bigcommerce. And that that helped you to create a better experience on that. Can you share a little bit about what what exactly that process looked like? Like, is this something that you created in house? Did you take like some other technology businesses API and implement that to make it easier? Like, is that like? More more of a custom platform that have your own specific business? Can you share a little bit about that?

David Rubie-Todd  

Yeah, yeah, absolutely. And it probably ties into one of the biggest mistakes we’ve made with with sticker is, when we first launched we, we, we had and we have big ambitions. So we thought we’ll, we started to build or we built the first site on Magento. Two, and we had about six full time devs on it at one point and just we could it was basically the wrong choice of technology for us. We spent pretty much all of the time sort of keeping the platform up, rather than developing features. So about 1516 Two months into, into the business, we sort of cut our losses and went across to Bigcommerce actually got all this a headless. So it’s got a WordPress front end. And we launched it within about six weeks and just sort of minimum viable product approach and just then iterated from there, that’s on the sort of the core ecommerce site if you like. And, and we’re actually in the process now of going again, with a sort of a jam stack site. So it’s much faster load times and that sort of things. But on the on the online designer, as we call it, graphic, it’s, that is a custom react application. And it’s, it’s all about helping, I mentioned those three categories of customer, the third one, the sort of creative individual doesn’t necessarily have access to artwork or to a design tool that doesn’t cost money and and so we try and help those people by giving them that tool. And it’s specifically designed, it’s a design tool for print. So it’s designed to work within the limitations of print, which are, which are more than in, say, safe use Canva, there’s, there’s a ton of things you can do there, which is an it’s an excellent tool. They’re sort of one of my idols, I think they’ve done a fantastic job. And we try and try and make it clear, and make it easy to design for print. So there’s certain that for certain limitations, for example, printers work in CMYK, cyan, yellow, magenta, and black, that has a much more limited color gamut or range of colors than then your screen, which is in RGB. And I think it’s something like 16,000 colors to 16 million colors, which sounds like a lot. But actually, it’s, it’s not as sort of a stark difference, as you may think. But so it’s just sort of basic things like that we try and make sort of really easy, it’s pretty new tool. We only launched it late last year. So it’s, it’s got a lot of work, we’ve got a lot of work to do on it.

Sushant Misra of TrepTalks  

So it was it was designed completely from scratch, like you’re not taking any any third party like open source design tool, and then the customizing it for your

David Rubie-Todd  

we’re not no unfortunately not which maybe we should have. We better have a big a big, big bite. And yeah, it’s cost a lot of money. Yeah, can you give us a lot of money, but hopefully, it’s, it proves to be value in the long term.

So

Sushant Misra of TrepTalks  

it’s very interesting, it seems like your biggest cost really is, is technology. And and I guess once you once you have the, the printers, there’s certain they probably have like, five, five or five to 10 years printing life or something. So yeah, very, very interesting business model. What does your team look like? Like? Do you work with a lot of people who have to manage those designs and shipping back and shipping those kind of things?

David Rubie-Todd  

Yeah, we’ve, there’s only about 15 of us really lean, maybe a bit too lean, but we try and keep it lean. And, and sort of solve as many problems through tech as we can. And I like to think of it as sort of removing the mundane. So keeping keeping the interesting bits for the people. So we have designers who, who take the artwork that customers give us and and sometimes it’s beautiful, perfect quality and other times it needs a bit of work to get it to a quality where it can be printed. So they spend time doing those sorts of things. Then yeah, the whole production team, who would run the printers, and all the finishing equipment and doing sort of packaging and shipping customers customer service side and then the sort of development team and then little marketing team. We work We work quite remotely so we’ve got people all over which has worked really well.

Sushant Misra of TrepTalks  

And it also like post purchase experience do you have do you offer like free shipping? What do you do I know I have shopped with Vistaprint before and like sometimes the design there was something not correct with the design and I asked them you know this is not right. And they will basically you know, reprint it and correct it and send it back like what what kind of post purchase experience because I would assume that it’s probably quite important in this business also Can you share a little bit about that?

David Rubie-Todd  

Yeah, exactly. Yeah, it’s, it’s we, we provide digital design proofs for everything. So we send a picture basically of what it’s going to look like. But there are limitations to that process. So we get, we get it as close as we can. And sometimes it’s other colors off or whatever. So, yeah, we offer free shipping. If there’s an error, we fix it. And we just try and we try. And every time we get that through, we try and look at, okay, what was the root cause of that? How can we make that bit of the experience better, because there’s always, there’s always something you can get better whether it be in its tiny, tiny little thing. So did that customer understand exactly, that, that sort of, we add an outline, does that represent the cut line, and it’s just tiny, you can sort of make almost 1000s of these tiny little improvements to make the experience that much better. Something we’ve done recently, and and it’s probably sort of really helped is, is a much more communication during the shipping process, because because we we print to order, it takes about four days to fulfill an order at the moment. And that’s a long time in the E commerce world. So constant communication, and people being able to click a link and seeing where sort of how their orders moving through a bit like sort of Domino’s Pizza tracker, you have a similar concept where you can see where it’s trending to see whether it’s cutting, to see when it’s been shipped, and then get your tracking info. And it’s having that communication is, is really important. Because, yeah, four days, plus shipping is a long time in in our world. So that’s one area I think we’ve learned a lot about is is how much you must think when you’re designing the system, or this feels like too much communication. But actually, when you’re the recipient, you’re on the other end, you really want to an email at every stage actually isn’t isn’t too much. Maybe could even be more for example, we’ve recently introduced texts just too. So we’ll send a design proof. As I mentioned, after someone places an order and actually sending that via text as well, it’s just we found to be really helpful, a lot, a lot of people, it’s a very easy process to do on your phone on the move. And instead of making someone to open up their email, etc, etc. And that’s been a good thing. So yeah. A lot of communication has been our learning there.

Sushant Misra of TrepTalks  

And do you use a third party software in order to do that, to send texts to just the whole tracking experience.

David Rubie-Todd  

We I mean, we ship using SoundCloud. And they then run. So from ship from sort of the moment the order, we make a label, basically, it’s actually send cloud sending those customer communications. But up until that point, it’s all us. So we’ve built what we call our my account, internally, and that’s what the customer will log into. And see see that designs they’ve got and see the status of their order.

So that’s that’s all sort of Yeah, built in built by us.

Sushant Misra of TrepTalks  

So basically transactional email through just a big commerce platform. And then afterwards, it’s sent cloud the the, the carrier shipment, tracking information, I guess.

David Rubie-Todd  

Yeah, yeah, big commerce doesn’t play a huge role. It’s just big commerce just for us sends the order confirmation, and then our own system. I think we use SendGrid to physically send emails, but our own system then takes over and does all the all the communication around proofing. So hey, what a brief for you to review, click this link go and have a look or and if they don’t do that a reminder. Or occasionally we might have a question. Or sometimes we can’t get the artwork to a good enough standard. So we just say, hey, you’ve got to, you’ve got to sort of higher quality piece of artwork can send us that’s all managed by our system. And then yeah, from the point of shipment at St. Cloud.

Sushant Misra of TrepTalks  

I know you did mention the, you know, some of the mistakes that you had before. I always ask this question to entrepreneurs, you know, you’ve been doing this business for I guess, what, almost 20 years I believe. What have been some of the biggest mistakes that you think you made? I mean, I’m sure there’s been lots of learning but some mistakes that other entrepreneurs can learn from you and avoid.

David Rubie-Todd  

Good question. I think I mentioned one of the biggest mistakes with sticker it was was the Magento decision. And the other was about not aren’t focusing on SEO soon enough and just sort of not quite appreciating its its power. It’s, it’s, it’s a sort of, it takes time to build, and you’ve almost got to sort of do a little bit every day for it to compound into something that’s, that’s genuinely valuable. So we didn’t, we didn’t start on SEO, anything like soon enough other things that have as tripped us up in terms of mistakes is is, is suppliers. So we we take raw material in, we process it and some stickers go out the door. If you only have one supplier, and they don’t deliver, you’re screwed pretty quick. And especially at the moment with the knock on effects of COVID. On just things like the release line, so the backing paper that goes on the back of your sticker, there is sort of a chronic supply shortage at the moment for the for those for that and it’s, it’s if you don’t have multiple suppliers, you might not use them all the time. But I think that was a lesson. And actually we, we learn a similar lesson probably back in 2008, nine, where we use the US supplier for for our cutting products and and basically they stopped delivering and a very quickly, I mean, within a matter of weeks, you can, if you don’t have a product coming in, you don’t have that product going out. And customers get pretty annoyed pretty quick. So that there were some big lands for us there on the manufacturing side.

And again, probably

David Rubie-Todd  

cash flow management, I think is a big learn. Understanding the difference between a p&l and a cash flow.

It’s

David Rubie-Todd  

you think you’re making profit, but actually, you sort of free cash flow for the month. And it’s, it’s quite a different number and understanding, genuinely understanding that took me a long time. And, and, and because of the working capital needed in a manufacturing business like ours, you’ve got to be hot on that. And that that has hurt us. I mean, luckily when we were sort of COVID came in, and it really hit cutting business because it’s all events based. We had to reserves to get us through. But I think if if you’re kind of living on the edge, and then in a manufacturing business and something like that happens, it can very quickly swallow you whole. If you’ve got all these leased machines that are 1000s Every month, and then you suddenly can’t afford the material to go on it. It can hurt very quickly. So

Sushant Misra of TrepTalks  

it makes sense. Are you on social media? Is social media driver of customers for your business? Or is it not really that relevant?

David Rubie-Todd  

For us, it’s it’s not a big channel, we do a poor job of social media. There are a few people in our industry that do a fantastic job. And I think it for them, it probably is. But for us, we just, we we focus almost completely on SEO and it’s worked really well for us. And when I feel like we’ve we’ve got that sort of properly resourced and kind of the process, I’m really happy with the process, then then I think we’ll move on to the next I just want to nail that channel first. And then move on to the next one which, which sometimes it’s that this may be short term detriment because I say our Instagram doesn’t look great. But I don’t want to do a sort of half job. And so yeah, for us, not a big driver. But I think for others in our industry, it probably is.

Sushant Misra of TrepTalks  

So now we’re going to move on to our rapid fire round. And then I’m going to ask a few quick questions and you can answer them maybe in one word or two words. So any any book recommendations for entrepreneurs or business people in 2022? And why?

David Rubie-Todd  

seven habits, habits of highly effective people because it’s probably one of the best books ever and principles by Ray Dalio because he’s spent a lot of time thinking about what made him successful and putting that into a book that you can buy for a tenner. And then it’ll sell I think, yeah, those two, maybe not the most entertaining but like, properly good For

Sushant Misra of TrepTalks  

an innovative product or idea in the current ecommerce retail or tech landscape that you feel excited about

David Rubie-Todd  

something we’ve recently started using is Jasper is sort of a an AI writing assistant if, and and it’s shockingly good. kind of took my breath away actually in how good it is. So that’s pretty cool.

Sushant Misra of TrepTalks  

So that right for blog posts or product descriptions.

David Rubie-Todd  

Yeah. And then he kind of looking at you think, is that surreal, and it’s pretty good. I’m impressed. So yeah, we’ve we’ve recently we’re experimenting with it at the moment. Okay.

Sushant Misra of TrepTalks  

I’m going to try a startup or business and E commerce retailer tech that you think is currently doing great things.

David Rubie-Todd  

A startup, I mean, something else that comes to mind that’s I think this is awesome is dialog flow, or Google have recently bought. I can’t remember the name of the business was before they bought it, but sort of they pulled it into their dialogflow products and their, their sort of natural language understanding is is is properly impressive. And I think that will impact in a lot of areas. So yeah, I think I think that’s pretty cool.

Sushant Misra of TrepTalks  

Any productivity tool or tip for other entrepreneurs?

David Rubie-Todd  

We use Asana, like asana and read Eat That Frog. Yeah, eat the frog is good. It’s a productivity book. And actually, time blocking is something that I’ve in the last probably year started doing and it in it, I sort of take quite a lot of time, consciousness isn’t one word answer, but take quite a lot of time at the start of the week to just think about what’s important and block my time and think it just just nudges. Well, it’s difficult to estimate how long something is going to take maybe the negative of it but the positive is it sort of it gets you started on the task and it blocks out some time for the important things which is cool.

Sushant Misra of TrepTalks  

Appear entrepreneur or business person whom you look up to or someone who inspires you.

David Rubie-Todd  

I’m very, very lucky to have had a mentor for most of my working life guy called Adam Norris. He is founder of a company called pure electric. He’s a very successful entrepreneur in his own right. And yeah, he’s spent a lot a lot of time with him. So yeah, he’s, he’s got to be that for me.

Sushant Misra of TrepTalks  

And final question, best business advice you have ever received, or you would give to other entrepreneurs

David Rubie-Todd  

focus on your passion. I think stages in life I haven’t. And it’s never been a good thing. And I’ve had I’ve, I’ve had a billionaire say that to me as well. So I think I think it took probably five years from them saying it for me to realize how important that is, which is sad. I know. But it’s still just I can remember it so vividly today. And I think he actually listened to you before

Sushant Misra of TrepTalks  

and one of your passion

David Rubie-Todd  

Good question. Building I can say great company, it’s, it’s, it’s building something that has a genuine positive impact, I think. So today, stickers. Stickers are sort of associated with plastic, but they don’t have to be. And I think if we can scale and transition millions of small companies to sustainable alternatives, I think this there’s quite a big positive impact that can make. So that’s we almost want to the sort of idea of this sort of people put a premium on stuff that’s environmentally friendly. I’d like to try and remove that and just it’s it’s compostable, but you almost don’t even know it. It’s you don’t buy it because it’s compostable. But it’s just that’s that’s an extra benefit. And I think if we can transition millions of square meters printed in the next few years across to stuff that’s degrades in a matter of months. I think that’s a cool thing.

Sushant Misra of TrepTalks  

Yeah, that’s very interesting. So many businesses now are trying to figure out ways to to become sustainable and for a good reason. So thank you. Thank you so much, David, for joining us today. Those were all the questions that I had. Now, if your time you can share your website, any way people can get in touch with you, please? Let us know. Yeah. Well, thank

David Rubie-Todd  

you very much for having me. If if you want stickers or labels, sticker Dotco is the web web address. And yeah, we hope we can hope we can help. And yes, good to chat.

Sushant Misra of TrepTalks  

Perfect. Thank you. Thank you so much, David, for joining us today for sharing your story for sharing. Lots of lessons learned. So really, really liked speaking with you. And thank you again for joining us today at treptalks.

David Rubie-Todd  

Yeah, thank you very much. Have a nice day.

Also, get inspired to Create a Profitable Online Business with Dinesh Tadepalli – Bringing Edible Spoons to Market to Reduce Single-Use Plastics


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